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Titien
Published by EF041008 on 2009/9/29
  Titien

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) was born in Pieve di Cadore, in the Dolomites, around 1488.

He became an official state painter and thereby obtained regular commissions. He worked for Princes who wanted to gain exposure, like the Estes of Ferrara, and the Gonzagas of Mantua.

He was in competition with Tintoretto and Veronese.
















Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) was born in Pieve di Cadore, in the Dolomites, around 1488. He learned the basic techniques of his craft in the workshop of Gentile Bellini and Sebastiano Zuccato.

But Giovanni Bellini and his spiritual father, Giorgone, were his true inspirations.
He was rapidly introduced to the courts of Mantua and Ferrara. He married and had 3 children, two of whom became painters like their father.

He was lucky to find himself in Venice in a period when the city was looking to exit a dark period and reestablish its aura.
He became known also at a moment when great painters like Giorgone and Bellini were at the end of their lives, or were leaving Venice, as was the case with Lotto, who went off to Bergamo.

These elements conspired to allow Titian a rapid ascension, and his talent was unanimously and internationally recognized. He was an excellent negotiator and he knew how to convert his wealth of talent into monetary success. 

                      Late Titian and the Sensuality of Painting    Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice
                                                 Cliquez sur les images


He became an official state painter and thereby obtained regular commissions. He worked for Princes who wanted to gain exposure, like the Estes of Ferrara, and the Gonzagas of Mantua.
His work was really flourishing.

He contributed to the renewal of classical painting thanks to numerous canvasses devoted to mythological scenes. He tamed the excessive tendencies of the painting of that period.
He knew how to sell himself in Europe’s royal courts. 

Thus he met and painted Francis the 1st,  as well as that sovereign’s sworn enemy, Charles the 5th  who named him Count Palatine. Around 1528, Titian finished his first period known as “the Olympian period.”
He had spiritual aspirations and was influenced by the mannerism coming from Mantua.

He broke from his naturalist vision to opt for more free-flowing figures. This is true of the equestrian portrait of Charles the 5th at the Battle of Mühlberg which expressed the strength of the mythic hero.

             

During his second part of life, he was in competition with Tintoretto and Veronese (see article Titien, Tintoret and Veronese : rivals in Venice

The third period of his life, which lasted nearly as long as the century life, saw him become ever more inspired by spirituality. He painted religious works, like the “Crucifixion” or the “Martyr of San Lorenzo.”

His painting became darker and ever more dramatic. As a result of his advancing age, Titian’s treatment of the human subject became more anguished.
The last years of his life were marked by his imminent death and by his exhaustion.

He finished his paintings by hand, as he was incapable of working any longer by brush. He could not finish his last religious composition, “La Pietà” which was completed by Palma Le Jeune.

Titian died of old age in 1576.



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