Very Important People on a Very Important Planet
french english Flux RSS
- Topics -
Infos
Connexion
Username:

Password:


Lost Password?

Register now!
Gallery
Slater
Published by EF041008 on 2008/10/25
Slater


Samuel Slater was born in 1768 in Belper, England. Slater went against the English prohibition of the engineers to emigrate and leave for the United States to sell their knowledge.
 
He took a boat to the United States disguised as a farmer and arrived in New York in 1789. he is now called the "Father of the American Industrial Revolution."
 





Samuel Slater was born in 1768 in Belper, England. At the age of 14, he began working as an apprentice and learned the use of technology in the textile field.
He understood that the English textile industry had some limitations and that the future might be elsewhere. America was sorely lacking engineers in this field and also gave $100 to those who knew English technology in this field.

Slater went against the English prohibition of the engineers to emigrate and leave for the United States to sell their knowledge. He took a boat to the United States disguised as a farmer and arrived in New York in 1789.

He offered his services to a Quaker, Moses Brown, established in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. The latter provided him with the funds to create a textile machine that uses water energy coming from the Blackstone River.

Slater hired families, including children, to run his machines and payed them less than $ 1 a week. Unfortunately, the living conditions at the time tolerated these practices that were prohibited in the United States in 1938 with the Fair Labor Standards Act.

In 1803, Slater and his brother built Slaterville in Rhode Island which is a large textile factory, which would inspire Francis Cabot Lowell. Samuel Slater died in 1835.

Thanks to his new soon system, he is now called the "Father of the American Industrial Revolution."
  View this article in PDF format Print article Send article

Navigate through the articles
Previous article Cabot Lowell Colt Next article
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren't responsible for their content.
Poster Thread